Nationwide Van LinesHomeInternational MovingVenezuela

Where Are You Moving?

Moving From:
Moving to:
Go »
Moving to Venezuela

Venezuela

Capital: Caracas
Population: 28,946,101 (2011)
Area: 353,841 sq. mi
Top 5 Largest Cities: 1. Caracas 2. Maracaibo 3. Valencia 4. Barquisimeto 5. Maracay
Lanuage: Spanish
Climate: Tropic, dry, polar and temperate
Motto: “Dios y Federacion” / “God and Federation”

Planning on moving to Venezuela soon? Nationwide Van Lines should be your number one choice. We take pride in our customers and moving them to their desired country overseas. We bring you highly trained moving consultants, the best materials and our caring attitude. Don’t hesitate, call us today for more detailed information!

Required Documents for Import

To assist clearing your household goods, documentation is very important. Please take a look at some of the documents that may be asked of you below.

Certificate of Origin – Gives verification of which country your household goods are manufactured in.

Import Declaration (DSI) – A document stating the household goods (HHGS) being shipped.

Import Requirements and Documentation

Customs will require details about you and your household goods (HHGS) shipment. Please review some of the needed documents of Customs:

  • A copy of your Passport displaying your recent entry stamp from a Venezuelan Immigration officer
  • Your original Bill of Lading
  • Certificate of Use, Certificado de Uso, received from the Venezuelan Consulate
  • The signature of shipper on all Customs forms
  • Letter of Employment
  • Stamped Resident Visa for returning residents
  • Copies of your invoice for all new items
  • A copy of the shipper’s Fiscal Information Registry (RIF) document
  • An Inventory List that’s describes the details of your shipment articles and “Packed by Owner” PBO items listed in English or Spanish
  • Diplomatic Franchise for Diplomats
  • Detailed Inventory list for Diplomats

Additional detailed document requirements

  • A Certificate of Use duly stamped by the Venezuelan consulate at your origin from returning citizens and residents whom lived abroad for no less than a year.
  • A Sanitation Permit if you have alcohol or food is within your shipment.
  • You should not display values on any documents or the Certificate of Use stamped by the Venezuelan Consulate at your origin.
  • If a Diplomat, your Diplomatic Franchise must be developed by the Embassy prior to Customs clearing your HHGS.
  • Antiques that are documents may be charged higher duties if shipped separately.
  • If a Diplomat, you will need 2 copies of your original Bill of Lading.
  • For non-residents with a TRANSEUNTE VISA3 can obtain a Certificate of Use at your Venezuelan Consulate or Embassy at origin to not pay duties and taxes. Your HHGS must be used for at least 6 months.
  • All wooden crates, lift vans, etc., will need to display a seal certifying that it has been treated by methyl bromide (MB) or heat treated (HT)

The Examination of Household Goods and Entry Documents

Once your household goods have arrived in Venezuela along with your documents, both are subjected to examination by Customs. A CBP officer will examine your household goods to determine the value, correct markings, proper invoicing, existence of prohibited items, damages, deterioration and illegal narcotics. It’s important to assure all items are properly described and accounted for to avoid any delays or seizure of items. Once your items are approved for release, they are safeguarded by the proper officers.

Duty and Taxes

Once your items has arrived to Venezuela, Customs and the National Guard will conduct clearance. Your duties can span from 5 to 20% of the Cost, Insurance and Freight (CIF) value and a Value-added Tax of 16% of the CIF value, duties and taxes. If you are a diplomat, you can have your shipments imported duty-free and tax-free. If you are a returning citizen, you can also have a your import duty-free and tax-free if you’ve received a stamped Certificate of Use at the Venezuelan Consulate at origin and if your HHGS satisfies Customs. If you are a non-resident, you must arrive in Venezuela before your shipment arrives and also be eligible for a Certificate of Use. You have up to 6 months for your shipment to arrive after you have arrived in Venezuela.

Duty-free Items

The following can be imported duty-free:

  • 200 Cigarettes
  • 25 Cigars
  • 2 liters of alcohol or one case per sea shipment container along with a Sanitation Permit
  • 4 small bottles of perfume
  • Up to $1,000 USD of goods

Labeling and Marking Requirements

The correct labeling and markings are very important for Customs. Each mark and label should be in the English language. Please take a look below to discover the marking and labeling requirements.

  • The name and address of the importer
  • The country of Origin
  • Clearly numbered in reflection of the inventory list
  • The quantity

Prohibited Items

Not every item is accepted for import in Venezuela. Please take a look at some of the items one cannot import into Venezuela.

  • Drugs
  • Firearms
  • Explosives
  • New furniture
  • Tobacco products
  • Chemical products, fertilizers, fungicides, etc.
  • Obscene articles, publications, videos and/or software’s
  • Negotiable bonds
  • Cash Letters
  • Ammunition
  • Drafts

Restricted Items

There are certain restrictions towards goods you may choose to move. To assure yourself of restrictions, please take a look at some of the restrictions below.

  • One of each item.
  • Up to $500 USD of costume jewelry. No jewelry is allowed for importation.
  • Electronic cigarettes requires an International Special Commodities (ISC) contract, Original Commercial Invoice, a Power of Attorney and Original Transportation Documents.
  • Firearms will require a special license.
  • Personal amount of paper products.

Receiving your Household Goods

The liability for duties are paid once Customs has cleared your shipment for release. There are no options of prepaid duties or taxes prior to exportation from a foreign country. Once your shipment is filed with CBP, the party and only the party listed as the receiver can pick up the shipment. If household goods are warehoused, the party of liability can be changed to another party, most whom purchased the goods. The Customs broker cannot pay duties, but can accept a check written out to the Customs and Border Protection to forward. Once items are received, all articles are deemed owned by the receiver and no longer in ownership of the CBP.

For more information regarding moving to Venezuela, please venture through the websites below.

http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1059.html
http://venezuela-us.org

All information featured above is for viewing purposes only. To obtain up-to-date information about overseas shipment, please notify your nearest Consulate.